Greening

Organisations devoted to greening and civic improvement

Listed below are groups and networks of groups devoted to doing practical work to improve the environment, community involvement and boost civic morale across Northern towns and places.

  1. Incredible North
  2. Transition Towns
  3. Federation of City Farms and Community Gardens
  4. Groundwork

1.  INCREDIBLE NORTH

http://incredibleediblenetwork.org.uk/IncredibleNorth

The Incredible Edible Todmorden project began in 2007, and has successfully promoted the growing more food in Todmorden by local residents, not just improving nutrition but improving local environments and changing lives.  The Incredible Edible Network now links more than 100 towns and places across the whole of England and across the world from Canada to New Zealand, all participating in the same concept.

The Incredible North is a new phase in the Incredible story – in their words “a new and crazy project all about using the Incredible Edible model to rethink what we mean by prosperity – life doesn’t have to look like growth at all costs, and health, wealth and happiness starts right here on our doorsteps”.

Incredible Edible local groups in the North with links

Cheshire

Incredible Edible Alderley Edge via Wilmslow
Incredible Edible Chester via Transition Chester
Incredible Edible Alleyway Ellesmere Port
Incredible Edible Wilmslow
Incredible Edible Winsford

Cumbria

Incredible Edible Crake Valley
Incredible Edible Penrith via PACT
Incredible Edible Ulverston

Greater Manchester

Incredible Edible Johnson Fold  (Bolton)
Incredible Edible Bromley Cross (Bolton)
Incredible Edible Bury
Incredible Edible Greenmount
Incredible Edible Heaton Moor  via Sustainable Living in the Heatons
Incredible Edible Levenshulme
Incredible Edible Marple
Incredible Edible Milnrow and Newhey
Incredible Edible Mossley
Incredible Edible Prestwich
Incredible Edible Ramsbottom
Incredible Edible Romiley
Incredible Edible Salford
Incredible Edible Summerseat Village Community (Bury)
Incredible Edible Tottington

Lancashire

Incredible Edible Accrington
I
ncredible Edible Darwen
Incredible Edible Fylde and Wyre
Incredible Edible Lancaster
Incredible Edible Preston
Incredible Edible Rossendale
Incredibe Edible Trawden

Liverpool City Region

Incredible Edible Hoylake

North East

Incredible Edible Ashington

Veg Out in Barny (Barnard Castle)

Incredible Edible Mackem Organic via Mackem Organic Gardeners
Incredible Edible Sunderland
Incredible Edible West Allotment  (Shiremoor, North Tyneside)

Tees Valley

Incredible Edible Darlington

West Yorkshire

Incredible Edible Aireborough
Incredible Edible Brighouse
Incredible Edible Kirkstall
Leeds Edible Campus
Incredible Edible Todmorden
Incredible Edible Wakefield

York & North Yorkshire

Edible York
The Incredible Movement in York

 

2.  TRANSITION TOWNS

Transition is a movement of communities coming together to reimagine and rebuild our world.  Central is the development of healthy communities.  The first Transition Town was Totnes, Devon in 2006.  There are now thousands of participating initiatives in over 35 countries across the world.

The Transition Network is based in Totnes, Devon and provides a central resource for Transition places across the world.  Each country has a national hub.

In UK, there is a separate national hub for Scotland.  The Transition Scotland website lists the following qualities for a transition initiative:

  • Viral: It spreads rapidly and pops up in the most unexpected places
  • Open Source: It is a model that people shape and take ownership of and is made available freely
  • Self organising: it is not centrally controlled, rather it is something people take ownership of and make their own
  • Solutions focused: it is inherently positive, not campaigning against things, rather setting out a positive vision of a world that has embraced its limitations
  • Iterative: it is continually learning from its successes and its failures and redefining itself, trying to research what is working and what isn’t
  • Clarifying: it offers a clear explanation of where humanity finds itself based on the best science available
  • Sensitive to place and scale: Transition looks different wherever it goes
  • Historic: it tries to create a sense of this being an historic opportunity to do something extraordinary – and perhaps most importantly of all
  • Joyful: if it’s not fun, you’re not doing it right

There is currently no specific organisation of Transition Towns at the level of the North of England, but there is nothing in the movement’s philosophy that would rule this out.

The Transition Network’s website cheerfully admits that its listings do not cover every Transition initiative.  The list of Transition initiatives in the North below is taken from the website.  Go to http://www.transitionnetwork.org to get contact and website details for any listed initiative.

Cheshire

Chester, Congleton, Frodsham, Kingsley, Macclesfield, Wilmslow

Cumbria

Brampton, Kendal & South Lakes, Penrith

East Yorkshire

Hornsea, Hull, Wilberfoss

Greater Manchester

Billinge & Orrell, Bolton, Chorlton cum Hardy, Moss Side, Oldham, Wigan, Withington

Lancashire

Garstang, Lancaster, South Ribble

Liverpool City Region

Hoylake, Liverpool

North East

Berwick-upon-Tweed, Frosterley, Tynedale

Tees Valley

Teesside

West Yorkshire

Hebden Bridge, Holmfirth, Ilkley, Leeds (Meanwood), Marsden

York & North Yorkshire

Kirkbymoorside, Knaresborough, York

3.  THE FEDERATION OF CITY FARMS AND COMMUNITY GARDENS

A community garden is a place that is run by the community to meet their own needs. They help to empower people of all ages and backgrounds to build better communities, often in deprived areas. A city farm not only includes gardening space but also farm animals.  The first city farm was established in Kentish Town, London in 1972, influenced by the children’s farm movement in the Netherlands.

There are now more than 120 city farms and school farms in England, nearly 1,000 community gardens and a growing number of community-managed allotments.

The Federation of City Farms and Community Gardens is based in Bristol.  The Federation has a Northern England and Midlands organiser based in Newcastle.  The member farms and gardens in the North are:

Cheshire

Cumbria

East Yorkshire

Greater Manchester

Lancashire

Liverpool City Region

North East

Northern Lincolnshire

South Yorkshire

Tees Valley

West Yorkshire

York & North Yorkshire

4.  GROUNDWORK

Groundwork UK is a federation of independent charities, the Groundwork Trusts.

Groundwork’s website states its mission as: “Changing places, changing lives – one green step at a time.  We work across the UK helping communities find practical solutions to the challenges they face.  We provide training and create jobs, reduce energy and waste, re-connect people with nature and transform whole neighbourhoods.  Step by step we’ll go on changing places and changing lives until everywhere is vibrant and green, every community is strong enough to shape its own destiny and everyone can reach their potential.”

The original ‘Operation Groundwork’ started in St Helens in 1982.  The driving force behind Groundwork was John Davidson, an inspirational environmental thinker working at the time for the Countryside Commission.  His vision was for an initiative that could mobilise people and money to make a difference to the prospects of struggling communities using the local environment as the trigger point for action.  The Groundwork idea and model took root across Britain in the 1980s, particularly in places suffering from the decline of traditional, land-hungry industries – coal mines, steel works, quarries – leaving landscapes blackened and scarred and whole communities isolated and facing a bleak future.  The full story is well told at http://www.operationgroundwork.org.uk/30-years-of-change

Groundwork UK is based in Birmingham.  The local Groundwork Trusts in the North have morphed and merged over the years, currently they are: